Skin cancer in dogs?

Discussion in 'Health & Nutrition' started by Libragirl67, May 10, 2013.

  1. Libragirl67

    Libragirl67 Member

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    I know dogs can get cancer just like humans do. But is it possible for a dog to get skin cancer? I have a neigbor who claims her aunts little poodle has skin cancer and it is costing them thousands of dolars for the treatments. I have never heard of this. Has anyone ever heard of dog skin cancer? Is it treatable, and what is the survival rate?
     
    Libragirl67, May 10, 2013
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  2. Libragirl67

    amundy8 Active Member

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    Skin cancer is actually more common in dogs. About one-third of dogs get some form of skin cancer. Some are benign and harmless. Carcinoma is a malignant cancer that is common and can start around around the cells and completely surround an organ. They usually occur in lighter skinned dogs and can be caused by sun damage. Limiting sun exposure is the best prevention, but if cancer occurs in a dog, surgery or radiation would have to be done to remove it.
     
    amundy8, May 14, 2013
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  3. Libragirl67

    claudine Well-Known Member

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    I had no idea that dogs can get skin cancer, it's really terrifying. My Homer loves lying in sun spots and he spends a lot of time outside the house, in our garden. He would be raging if I made him stay at home more often. Now I really regret shortening his hair:(
     
    claudine, May 14, 2013
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  4. Libragirl67

    argon_0 Well-Known Member

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    I was aware of skin cancer in dogs. Mishka has a pink area just above her nose. When we go to the beach I am always concerned she may get sunburnt.
    Australia is renowned for having a high incidence of skin cancers. Even on a cool day in my part of the country the sun can have quite a sting in it as low as 14C outside.
    It may have something to do with the ozone layer depletion above.
    So if you do have pets with pink skin showing, take care they don't get sunburnt.
     
    argon_0, May 16, 2013
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  5. Libragirl67

    claudine Well-Known Member

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    Fortunately Homer doesn't have any pink skin showing...well, he has it only on his belly - but he rarely sleeps on his back outside the house so it isn't exposed to sunlight. Also, he is often covered with dust and mud and it probably provides some kind of protection:eek:
     
    claudine, May 16, 2013
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  6. Libragirl67

    trishgl Well-Known Member

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    I never knew that. Thank you for the information, I had assumed since they are covered in fur that its some kind of protection for them. I'll try to limit my chow's exposure by walking her earlier in the morning and later in the afternoon.
     
    trishgl, May 16, 2013
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  7. Libragirl67

    zararina Well-Known Member

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    I have seen dogs with baldness and some sort of skin diseases but I am not aware that skin cancer is also a disease for dogs.
     
    zararina, May 25, 2013
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