Hairless Dog Breeds

Discussion in 'Breeding' started by haopee, Apr 11, 2012.

  1. haopee

    haopee Well-Known Member

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    Since they don't have fur, exposing them under direct sunlight should be avoided. Infact, hairless dog breeds require sunscreen to keep their skin protected from the sun. This is just one of the very few facts I know about hairless dogs. Other than that, I can only assume that they're either a Chinese Crested or a Mexican Hairless.

    hairless_khala.jpg
    This is a Hairless Khala. Photo courtesy of Molly Jones

    Here are some hairless dog breeds out there.

    1. Mexican Hairless Dog or Xoloitzcuintle
    2. Peruvian Inca Orchid
    3. Hairless Khala or Pila
    4. American Hairless Terrier
    5. Chinese Crested (hairless variety)
     
    haopee, Apr 11, 2012
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  2. haopee

    Jessi Well-Known Member

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    After reading this, I realized just how little I knew about hairless dogs in general, too.

    So of course, that meant I went researching and this is the interesting tidbit I found:

    I had no idea they wouldn't have any other health issues, which is kinda neat to know.
     
    Jessi, Apr 11, 2012
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  3. haopee

    zararina Well-Known Member

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    I think these hairless dogs are the ones that should have some dress or clothing specially when they are outdoor. But of course they should be very comfortable with it or else just use the sun screen cream.
     
    zararina, Apr 12, 2012
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  4. haopee

    Jessi Well-Known Member

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    As much as I don't like dog clothes, you're right about that being a viable option. I think I'd rather see them get put in clothes from the time they're a puppy so they're used to it than to rely on chemical creams to protect them from the sun. Chances are, they're also the type that get cold more easily, too, which means they may actually need clothes to help hold in body heat during other times of the year.
     
    Jessi, Apr 12, 2012
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  5. haopee

    dkramarczyk Well-Known Member

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    I think having a hairless dog would feel kind of weird. Is there skin soft? It might feel weird petting them. Not that I'm opposed to having one. The pup in the picture looks absolutely adorable. I wonder how many people out there with hairless dogs don't care for them properly. I never even thought about the sunscreen.
     
    dkramarczyk, Apr 19, 2012
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  6. haopee

    kinser Well-Known Member

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    I just couldn't have a hairless dog, as shallow as that sounds. Which is a little odd since I'm always complaining of my dogs' constant shedding. But I just don't like the look. I also think it's sad that humans have manipulated certain breeds to a detriment. How is the poor thing supposed to naturally keep warm?
     
    kinser, Apr 20, 2012
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  7. haopee

    Victor Leigh Well-Known Member

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    There's a very simple solution to that. Only people in hot climates should keep hairless dogs. Just as only people in cold climates should keep thick-haired dogs.
     
    Victor Leigh, Apr 20, 2012
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  8. haopee

    Jessi Well-Known Member

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    I couldn't either. I mean, if there were one left without a home and I was an option, then I wouldn't turn it away for that reason alone, of course, but I'd never seek out that breed specifically. The same goes for hairless cats. :S
     
    Jessi, Apr 20, 2012
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  9. haopee

    kinser Well-Known Member

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    Me too, LOL. I just love cats, but the hairless ones look way too freaky. Of course, like you said, I'd provide for one in need (I'd do that for any animal, no matter how ugly, LOL), but I wouldn't seek one out to own. Shame on people for developing these breeds! Not just because of aethetics, either. How awful would it be to have no coat for protection, as an animal?
     
    kinser, Apr 22, 2012
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  10. haopee

    kinser Well-Known Member

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    Yes, but people can't always be trusted to be fantasic owners. I hate to think of the discomfort these poor dogs might potentially experience if their owners aren't constantly aware of their needs.
     
    kinser, Apr 22, 2012
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  11. haopee

    Jessi Well-Known Member

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    Exactly.

    While you might be tempted to go with the "only in hot climates" solution, you have to remember that hot climates are also likely to get a lot of sun. Guess what? Hairless dogs burn very easily and have to either be kept indoors or covered. You can add sunscreen, but it'd have to be frequently and you still have to be careful so they don't scorch.
     
    Jessi, Apr 23, 2012
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  12. haopee

    Victor Leigh Well-Known Member

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    You have point there about the danger of sunburn for a hairless dog in a hot climate. However, I still believe that dogs which have double-coats which were bred for work in cold countries should not be reared in tropical countries. I have personally seen a couple of St. Bernards really suffering in Thailand. People who bring such dogs into tropical countries must be prepared to keep them in air-conditioned rooms.

    The exception might be Bangkeaws. They are bred in a tropical environment right from the beginning. And Bangkeaws have thick double-coats. Maybe it's because originally Bangkeaws lived on raft houses and probably spent as much time in the water as out of it. One thing I know for sure is my Candy can spend the whole day submerged in a tub of water with just her head resting on the edge while she sleeps.
     
    Victor Leigh, Apr 23, 2012
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  13. haopee

    Jessi Well-Known Member

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    You're right. I don't think thick-covered dogs should end up in tropical locations. I don't see hairless dogs as a "natural" breed either and rather, it's something that was bread to be that way....and they don't really have a "natural habitat" either, I don't think.
     
    Jessi, Apr 24, 2012
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  14. haopee

    Victor Leigh Well-Known Member

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    I am not too sure about that part not having a natural habitat. There are actually some hairless dog breeds which are not totally bred just for show. Consider this one here:
    [​IMG]
    It's a Xoloitzcuintli, a dog breed that's native to Mexico and has been around for 3,000 years. More information here:​
     
    Victor Leigh, Apr 24, 2012
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  15. haopee

    kinser Well-Known Member

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    I guess if it's been around that long, it may have evolved naturally. I bet the darker skin protects this one from sun-burning so easily, and if it lives in Mexico, it probably never has to worry about getting cold!
     
    kinser, Apr 25, 2012
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  16. haopee

    Jessi Well-Known Member

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    I can't help but wonder if the only reason they survived as a species is because various groups decided they were "special" and treated them as such. In the wild, those rare mutations would've possibly evolved out and never survived, but having people take them in, protect them, etc, caused them to be able to breed and pass on the mutation anyway, which may not have happened in the wild...
     
    Jessi, Apr 26, 2012
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  17. haopee

    Victor Leigh Well-Known Member

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    Look at these two pictures:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    The first is a Xolo. The other one is a Chinese Crested. I wonder if the two breeds are related.​
     
    Victor Leigh, Apr 26, 2012
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  18. haopee

    kinser Well-Known Member

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    I think Chinese Crested look hideous. I wonder how their personalites are, LOL?
     
    kinser, Apr 26, 2012
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  19. haopee

    Jessi Well-Known Member

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    I pulled some quotes from this site: http://dogtime.com/dog-breeds/chinese-crested

    I never realized how clingy they were!


     
    Jessi, Apr 26, 2012
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  20. haopee

    Victor Leigh Well-Known Member

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    My dear Jessi, you have just opened up a whole new line of thought in my mind. I am now seriously considering getting a Chinese Crested. It's sounds like a great companion for an old man who spends the whole day in front of the computer.
     
    Victor Leigh, Apr 27, 2012
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