Can Cross Breeding Effect Temperament?

Discussion in 'Breeding' started by jules21158, Jan 20, 2012.

  1. jules21158

    jules21158 Member

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    My son has a Jack Russell called Sid but we believe he is a cross as his head is large like a alsations and he has a bigger body than my other son's Jack Russell.

    Sid is now becoming aggressive towards members of the family and I wondered if this was a direct result of cross breeding?
     
    jules21158, Jan 20, 2012
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  2. jules21158

    MakingCents Well-Known Member

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    Cross breeding in theory doesn't change temperment, it just gives the dog a sampling of temperament from each breed. But even a pure bred dog, with great temperament in his history doesn't gurantee that he will have a good temperament.
     
    MakingCents, Jan 21, 2012
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  3. jules21158

    zararina Well-Known Member

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    I do not think his behavior was the result of being a cross breed. I do have cross breed dogs before and each have different behavior. There are those who are so behaved and there are some that are aggressive. And I think all those have different behavior or personality regardless of pure breed or mixed breed.
     
    zararina, Jan 21, 2012
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  4. jules21158

    Victor Leigh Well-Known Member

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    Breeding is meant to produce certain characteristics. However upbringing can either enhance those characteristics or replace them with new ones. So a docile breed like a Golden Retriever can become a vicious animal if brought up the wrong way. Just as the reputedly vicious Rottweiler can be brought up to become an amiable family pet.
     
    Victor Leigh, Feb 5, 2012
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  5. jules21158

    MakingCents Well-Known Member

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    Right victor, breeding is meant to produce certain characteristics but it cant' be exact. Dogs are still free-thinkers and no matter their breed or how they are raised they can still out differently.
     
    MakingCents, Feb 6, 2012
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  6. jules21158

    Victor Leigh Well-Known Member

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    I think people who think that certain human races are superior to other human races should take a lesson from the dog breeders. Also take a look at all the fantastic dogs found in the dog shelters. Lineage doesn't define anyone's chances of success in life.
     
    Victor Leigh, Feb 7, 2012
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  7. jules21158

    Jani Member

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    I would not think that breeding, in and of itself will produce an aggressive dog. Although I do believe that some breeds have a greater tendency toward protection/territoriality and what can be viewed as aggression. Good training techniques can make a huge difference. Dog behaviorists really can do amazing work.
     
    Jani, Feb 8, 2012
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  8. jules21158

    summerRain Well-Known Member

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    I must say Victor Leigh and MakingCents are right. There are certain breeds that carries different characteristics. A crossbreed dog might acquire the traits of its parents like appearance and behavior.
     
    summerRain, Feb 10, 2012
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  9. jules21158

    LoupGarouTFTs Well-Known Member

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    Temperament is largely environmental, but it can also be inherited to acdegree. Crossbreedijg won't create an aggressive dog where no dog was aggressive before, but the temperaments of both male and female ancestors can influence the temperaments of the get. Also, if a dog develops aggression over time, it might be that it is experiencing pain or discomfort from sn unseen source. A physical exam is usually recommended in order to rule out physical causes of aggression.
     
    LoupGarouTFTs, Feb 16, 2012
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  10. jules21158

    Victor Leigh Well-Known Member

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    I think the role of the owner's own temperament in shaping the temperament of the pet must not be overlooked. Basically a dog looks to its owner as the pack leader. Alpha male, if you want to look at it that way. So the owner is the basic role model for the pet.
     
    Victor Leigh, Feb 18, 2012
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    King Browny likes this.
  11. jules21158

    LoupGarouTFTs Well-Known Member

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    The problem with temperament is that it's development is so complex. A dog will probably not develop an owner's modeled temperament, because humans don't have the same behaviors that dogs do--but humans can affect a dog's temperament by how they treat their dogs. People with poor temperaments are more likely to treat their animals roughly or poorly, which will affect the way the animal interacts with the world.
     
    LoupGarouTFTs, Feb 19, 2012
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  12. jules21158

    summerRain Well-Known Member

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    We can really affect the temperament of our pets. My new puppy who is a stray dog is showing good manners because I treat him like how I treat myself. I can even touch his body while he's eating while other dogs would bite their owner in this situation. I can tell that he likes what I am doing 'cause he's wagging his tail while enjoying his meal.
     
    summerRain, Mar 6, 2012
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  13. jules21158

    Victor Leigh Well-Known Member

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    That's sounds like a dangerous thing to do. I have always being told not to interrupt the dogs when they are eating. So, in your case, your dog must really feel very secure with you to allow you to do that.
     
    Victor Leigh, Mar 7, 2012
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  14. jules21158

    summerRain Well-Known Member

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    I think that's a compliment. Thank you Victor. Well I guess he feel safe whenever I am near. I even let him to sleep in my bed. In that way, I can enjoy caressing his young fluffy coat.
     
    summerRain, Mar 7, 2012
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  15. jules21158

    King Browny Well-Known Member

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    I think, yes. The dog's root will stem on their personality. It’s heredity, right? And it’s up to the owner to subdue it or train the dog for proper behavior or behavior control.
     
    King Browny, Mar 9, 2012
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  16. jules21158

    MakingCents Well-Known Member

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    de-sensitizing your puppy to things like that is important when they are a puppy. THat way if someone accidentally bumps the dog when eating or an un-knowing child touches the dog when he is eating the dog does not have the instinct to bite.
     
    MakingCents, Mar 9, 2012
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  17. jules21158

    Victor Leigh Well-Known Member

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    I think there are exceptions to this instinctive behavior. I remember when I got my Dobermann puppy, I was specifically told by its mother's owner never to touch it when it's eating. However, I forgot and used to pat its head to praise it when it ate with gusto. (Dobermanns can really eat!) It didn't bite my hand or got angry in any way. Maybe it was happy that I gave it so much to eat.
     
    Victor Leigh, Mar 10, 2012
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  18. jules21158

    dkramarczyk Well-Known Member

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    Dogs often still have a mind of their own, so I do not think that this is a direct result of cross breeding. Maybe he just needs a little more TLC (tender loving care)?
     
    dkramarczyk, Apr 4, 2012
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  19. jules21158

    Victor Leigh Well-Known Member

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    True, dogs do have a mind of their own. Just like children. However it is still possible to modify a dog's temperament. Much in the same way we modify a child's temper. Come to think of it, raising a dog is not that different from bringing up a child.
     
    Victor Leigh, Apr 5, 2012
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  20. jules21158

    LilAnn Well-Known Member

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    I don't know how true this is, I can't even remember where I read it. But what I do remember is reading that pits naturally get along with humans. If left to their own devices, and not trained or abused they'll be very loyal and loving. But if you breed a pit with a dog that doesn't naturally get along with humans, its going to cause the pup a lot of anguish. It'll be conflicted, and that'll cause it to be more aggressive and angry.
     
    LilAnn, May 23, 2015
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